Looking ahead to the 2020 Hockey Hall of Fame ballot
B Bennett / Bruce Bennett / Getty

With the 2019 Hockey Hall of Fame induction weekend in the rearview mirror, it's time to look ahead to the NHL players on the 2020 ballot.

Players were placed in alphabetical order in their respective tiers.

The Lock

Jarome Iginla

GP G A P
1554 625 675 1300

There's no denying Iginla's place in hockey's most sacred building. He was a three-time first-team All-Star, a two-time Maurice "Rocket" Richard winner, an Art Ross winner, and a three-time Hart Trophy finalist. Iggy never won the Stanley Cup, but he did earn a world junior gold medal, a World Championship gold, a World Cup, and two Olympic golds. A dominant two-way power forward, he's 16th all time on the NHL's goals list despite playing during the league's toughest scoring era.

Strong case

Daniel Alfredsson

GP G A P
1246 444 713 1157

Alfredsson has been passed over a few times now, but his time should eventually come. He was among the league's most consistent players for nearly two decades, winning the Calder Trophy in 1995-96, being named a second-team All-Star in 2005-06, and earning an Olympic gold medal in 2006.

Sergei Gonchar

GP G A P
1301 220 591 811

Gonchar checks off the longevity box, but his peak was also sensational, as he racked up 585 points in 753 games from his age 24-35 seasons. He was a second-team All-Star twice over that span and played a crucial role in Pittsburgh's Stanley Cup win in 2009. He was never named a Norris Trophy finalist but has the third-most points of any D-man not in the Hall of Fame.

Marian Hossa

B Bennett / Bruce Bennett / Getty
GP G A P
1309 525 609 1134

Hossa may not be inducted in his first year of eligibility, but he seems destined to be at some point. A premier two-way winger, Hossa won three Stanley Cups with the Chicago Blackhawks and reached two other finals with the Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings.

Alexander Mogilny

GP G A P
990 473 559 1032

Mogilny was one of the most electrifying players of his time. He finished tied for the league lead in goals with 76 in 1992-93, was twice named a postseason All-Star, and is a member of the prestigious Triple Gold Club. Aside from his on-ice exploits, Mogilny became the first NHLer to defect from Russia, paving the way for other Russian legends.

On the bubble

Rod Brind'Amour

GP G A P
1484 452 732 1184

With Guy Carbonneau now in the Hall of Fame, there's a case to be made for Brind'Amour. He only won two Selke Trophies compared to Carbonneau's three but was a much more productive player in a more difficult scoring era. He also captained the Carolina Hurricanes to the 2006 Stanley Cup.

Patrik Elias

GP G A P
1240 408 617 1025

Elias' name doesn't scream "Hall of Fame," but he was quietly a very productive player despite featuring in New Jersey's trap system for much of his career. He was a reliable defensive player, too, and won a pair of Stanley Cups. His peak likely wasn't high enough, but there's certainly a conversation to be had.

Theo Fleury

GP G A P
1084 455 633 1088

Fleury built an intriguing case as one of the game's most ferocious competitors while standing at just 5-foot-6. His resume is impressive: 1,000 points, two 100-point seasons, a 50-goal campaign, a Stanley Cup, an Olympic gold medal, and a point-per-game playoff average. His lack of individual hardware will likely keep him out, whether fair or not.

Curtis Joseph

Elsa / Getty Images Sport / Getty
GP W GAA SV% SO
943 454 2.79 .906 51

Joseph never won a Stanley Cup or a Vezina Trophy, though he was a finalist for the latter on three occasions. Cujo had an ability to stand on his head and steal games for teams that had no business winning, like the '93 Blues, '97 Oilers, and '99 Maple Leafs. He's sixth on the all-time wins list - the most victories of any eligible goalie not in the Hall of Fame.

Pierre Turgeon

GP G A P
1294 515 812 1327

No Hall of Fame-eligible player has more points than Turgeon. You'd think the numbers would speak for themselves, but while playing in the highest-scoring era with some all-time greats, he was never named a finalist for any major award (sorry, Lady Byng) and couldn't win a Stanley Cup.

Doug Wilson

GP G A P
1024 237 590 827

Wilson has been on the ballot for a long time, but Sergei Zubov's induction could help his case moving forward as an offensive defenseman. He has the second-most points of any rearguard not enshrined and won the Norris Trophy in 1982. If Wilson fails to get in as a player, he could eventually get in as a builder for his work as San Jose Sharks general manager.

Not looking good

Dan Boyle

GP G A P
1093 163 442 605

Boyle had a nice career, winning a Stanley Cup and being named a second-team All-Star twice. Still, his overall resume pales in comparison to other blue-liners in consideration.

Shane Doan

Charles LeClaire / USA Today
GP G A P
1540 402 570 972

If you like longevity and loyalty then Doan is your guy, but his peak was nowhere near Hall-of-Fame caliber. He's listed due to this being his first year of eligibility.

Vincent Lecavalier

GP G A P
1212 421 528 949

Lecavalier was on track for the Hall of Fame, but injuries took their toll in the back half of his career. His production suffered, as he tallied just 210 points in his age-30 season and beyond. Still, he has a Stanley Cup, a Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy, and an MVP award for the 2004 World Cup of Hockey.

Jere Lehtinen

GP G A P
875 243 271 514

Lehtinen's prospects are certainly aided by Carbonneau's induction, as they both won three Selke Trophies. Lehtinen also won a Stanley Cup, but his overall numbers probably won't be enough to get him in.

Brad Richards

Dave Sandford / Getty Images Sport / Getty
GP G A P
1126 298 634 932

Richards is the third member of the 2004 Tampa Bay Lightning on this list, and he might have as good a chance as any of them. He won the Conn Smythe that year and another Stanley Cup with the Blackhawks in 2015. He didn't quite excel at the most important facet of the game (goal-scoring), which will likely cause him to miss out.

Jeremy Roenick

GP G A P
1363 513 703 1216

Roenick's counting stats are Hall-of-Fame worthy, but he lacks both individual and team awards. This has been his Achilles heel during his entire time on the ballot, so unless there are some philosophical changes in the boardroom, it's unlikely J.R. gets in.

Keith Tkachuk

GP G A P
1201 538 527 1065

Tkachuk scored more goals than any eligible player not already inducted. Similar to Roenick, his lack of hardware is likely what's keeping him out despite boasting the numbers. It's possible that Tkachuk's sons can help grow his legacy, but it seems unlikely he gets in next year.

Comments
Looking ahead to the 2020 Hockey Hall of Fame ballot
  Got something to say? Leave a comment below!
Daily Newsletter
Get the latest trending sports news daily in your inbox