Building the perfect player using traits from non-All-Stars
Building the perfect player using traits from non-All-Stars

Building the perfect NBA player using All-Stars would be simple.

What if LeBron James had Stephen Curry's range? Could anyone stop Kevin Durant with John Wall's speed? DeMarcus Cousins with Chris Paul's maniacal focus would be unguardable. Giannis Antetokounmpo combined with Kyrie Irving's handle and jump shot is a nightmare to imagine.

It's easy to play this game using All-Stars because they're already mostly perfect, with just one or two flaws. Building a superstar out of everyday rotation players, however, is a much tougher challenge.

Frame: Kristaps Porzingis

Porzinigis is called The Unicorn for a reason. He's a 7-foot-3 center who moves with the fluidity of a guard, his absurd length makes him a tough hurdle at the rim, and his mobility allows him to limit penetration on the perimeter.

The same dynamics apply on offense. Porzingis' height allows him to shoot over most defenders, and he has the wheels to drive past almost anybody with enough size to contest his shot.

Athleticism: Zach LaVine

This one needs no explanation. LaVine is the most electric dunker the league has seen since Vince Carter.

Defense: Rudy Gobert

It's almost unfair to draw from the All-NBA talents of Gobert, who was worthy of an All-Star selection but was simply squeezed out due to the overabundance of talent in the West last season.

Gobert is the best rim-protector in the league, and nobody is particularly close. The Stifle Tower is the very definition of a defensive anchor capable of erasing any mistakes made on the perimeter by walling off the basket.

Shooting: C.J. McCollum

Specialists like J.J. Redick and Patty Mills might be better spot-up shooters, but they need other teammates to create for them, or to come off screens at the very least. They can't get their own shot.

McCollum is prolific in every scenario. He made 41.5 percent of his catch-and-shoot threes while also nailing 43.1 percent of pull-up treys last season. And he's just as deadly in the mid-range, where he can attack off a screen and rise calmly for an elbow jumper as the defense backpedals.

Handle: Jamal Crawford

Crawford is still cooking defenders on the regular as he heads into his 18th season. The ageless wonder has shown zero signs of decline because everything he creates comes out of pure skill.

There isn't a single dribble move that Crawford doesn't have in his arsenal. He can handle with either hand, string together multiple crossovers, change directions on the fly, switch between his legs, and use his signature behind-the-back hesitation move to make defenders look foolish.

Playmaking: Ricky Rubio

Rubio is quietly one of the league's most enchanting and electric players, but he struggles because the modern game demands scoring above all else from the lead guard. Rubio can't finish, but he's easily a top-five distributor.

The Spaniard is simply a genius with the basketball. Whether it's going behind the back, spinning full-court alley-oops, or just making the correct hit-ahead passes to advance the play, Rubio always puts it on a platter.

Go-to move: Mike Conley's floater

Conley is another classic point guard who tries to distribute before looking for his own shot, even though he can create quality offense whenever he wants with his patented floater.

Not only does he have excellent timing and touch, but the ambidextrous Conley can launch his floater with either hand. The old-school move makes him an impossibly slippery scoring threat whenever he gets into the lane.

Mentality: Patrick Beverley

Playing hard is a talent, and nobody plays harder than Beverley, who approaches every game like he's on a 10-day contract. The Los Angeles Clippers guard is an absolute nightmare on defense, and is sure to hassle (and even occasionally injure) opponents as he gives everything he's got. He never takes a possession off and doesn't back down from any challenge.

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