Subban on trade: 'I don't hold the cards and make those decisions'

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Jonathan Kozub / National Hockey League / Getty

After admitting that he always envisioned playing for the Montreal Canadiens in part 1 of his sit-down interview with Sportsnet's Eric Engels, P.K. Subban continued to dive into the deal that sent him to the Nashville Predators in part 2.

Related: Subban speaks: 'I never envisioned myself playing for any other team'

Subban reflected on the trade itself and his final moments with the team - spent on a stretcher - and why he felt that his beloved Canadiens ultimately traded him away. Through it all, the 27-year-old appeared to still be unsure as to why he was shipped out.

"I did everything that I could to help the team win every night, I gave everything tried to represent the Canadiens the best way I could, but at the end of the day I don't hold the cards and make those decisions," Subban said. "I just wish I could have won a Stanley Cup for that organization and this city, I just don't have that opportunity to do that now so I have to focus on Nashville."

During his time with the Canadiens, the media clung to the notion that Subban might not have had the best rapport with his teammates, especially given multiple episodes of fights in practice, but Subban remained firm on the assertion that such claims are false.

"I would have to disagree with that. With the guys that I'm with every day that I travel with, that I play with, we're all different," said Subban. "At the end of the day I'd like to hope these guys respect me and I respect them and that's really what it's been built on."

Of course Subban's trade comes at a very monumental time in the United States. The country is currently amid daily protests for social change following recent extreme acts of gun violence and the #BlackLivesMatter campaign.

Subban - being Canadian - noted it wasn't necessarily his place to comment on another country's politics, but that he shares the same sentiment of others in hoping that there will hopefully be a peaceful resolution.

"Obviously there is a lot of different things going on around the world all we can hope is that one day all the violence can stop," said Subban. "When it comes to the world in general, I do hope that the violence can stop and we don't have to read about that stuff anymore."